Diy Dog Crate

Diy Dog Crate

Hi Cindy, I hear it’s just beautiful over there…I’m hoping to take the family next summer on a trip to explore Europe, can’t wait! My dog was three years old when we adopted him and was already crate trained. I consider his anxiety an ongoing problem that always needs to be managed. We tried keeping him out of the cage this week, but he’s starting to poop again in the house (in protest) of our leaving. So we’re back to the crate. My dog didn’t even chew his toys when we first got him…so getting him chew toy and treats he will actually use was one step to manage his anxiety and keeps his mind occupied. Our dog is also a herding breed and he had dominance issues. Unfortunately, that means I had to dominate him, and was very strict. He’s not allowed to bolt (aka sprint) ahead of me through doorways. He’s not allowed on our furniture (he thinks he’s equal to me eventually and starts thinking he’s dominant again). He has to work for every treat (does a few simple tricks as part of the request). He’s a LOT of work! But I’m sure you’ll get there eventually with your dog. That’s why I said “dog ownership is no joke”. It is a LOT of work, as our dog came with many issues.
diy dog crate 1

Diy Dog Crate

This is gorgeous, and a very creative re-use of an old crib. But I have some safety concerns about the design. First, the curved openings in the corners where the crib ends meet the rails look big enough for a curious dog to stick a paw through them. My luck with inventive dogs always runs bad, and I envision that paw getting caught, causing the dog to panic and injure a leg. Second, some dogs are crate chewers, and could gnaw themselves out of a crate like this in no time. At the moment I can’t think of a way around the chewing issue, other than to know your dog really well before putting them in a crate like this. But the corner opening problem could be fixed by cutting off the curved edges of the ends before assembly, or by not using a crib with that curved accent on the ends.
diy dog crate 2

Diy Dog Crate

I love the crib/dog crate idea. I do have a suggestion for you. My dogs love a good, comfy dog bed but most of the ones filled with fluff break down over time and some are not easily washed because of their size. Memory foam and orthopedic beds are very expensive. I’ve been buying crib mattresses (Craigslist) for around $5 each, sometimes less, and I use the crib sheets to cover them. If there’s an accident, the sheets wash and dry easily and you can readily find crib sheets at most garage sales. The mattress is vinyl and easy to clean. I keep one in the bedroom next to our bed and in the morning it’s easy to shove it under the bed and get it out of the way. They are sturdy enough to hold a 100 pound dog and they’re so much better than most dog beds.
diy dog crate 3

Diy Dog Crate

For the ultimate out-of-the-way dog crate, find an unused nook in the house to build a private room for your pet. Under a staircase is a great option or in a hallway nook. I have a spot in my house that I think this project would be perfect for, but my husband is worried about how future homeowners would feel about our built-in. I can’t imagine not buying a house because they have a built-in dog crate, and since when do I make any decorating decision based on what a future homeowner thinks ;)? I’m not going to let it stop me from potentially proceeding with my doggy built-in plans; however, it is certainly something to consider before cutting a hole into your wall.
diy dog crate 4

Diy Dog Crate

You are right to be concerned about the wheels not locking. If I ever use it on a hard surface I will for sure replace them with locking casters, the dogs safety is most important. In fact, the crate does not need wheels at all, I just knew I would need a way to move it when my husband wasn’t around. I have the crate in my room on the carpet and the wheels do not move. I was worried about it at first, but have noticed that it has not been a problem at all, even when she stands up and moves in her crate. Maybe it is because they are older casters and don’t roll very well, lol! Thank you so much for your concern and kind words!

Diy Dog Crate

What a cute sheltie – and I love what you’ve done with his crate! We also have shelties. Of the 6 my husband and I have had together, 3 have been rescues, including 2 of our 3 current furbabies, Oliver and Shelby. Oliver had many adjustment issues, but is now doing very well. Ike was an elderly sheltie who had been turned over to a kill shelter by family who said they were moving and could not take him along. We believe he was also a puppy mill dog. He had many of the same issues you describe in Buddy. I have never seen a more anxious sheltie. He was incredibly sweet, and just melted our hearts. But he was a true challenge. We only had him a year before he died suddenly of liver failure, but take comfort in knowing that it was a year in a loving home with a family who would make him a priority. I already understood the value of rescue, but it truly brought home the difference between a well bread dog from a breeder, and a puppy mill dog. Good luck to you and Buddy! I understand how challenging he must be, and applaud you for not giving up on him. I hope to hear more about how he’s doing in future blog entries!
diy dog crate 6

Diy Dog Crate

Buddy’s crate is his safe place. It’s where he goes to calm down. His issues are mostly resolved, but still has separation anxiety. Without the crate, he would have likely hurt himself as he panics and runs all over the house when we leave.Dog ownership is no joke. It comes with a lot more gear and responsibility than I ever anticipated. They truly are our “kids”. So just like any kids’ room, I had to get a better system when it came to storing Buddy-gear.
diy dog crate 7

Diy Dog Crate

This is a pretty simple table build. We purchased four Parson’s wood legs, 28″ long and built a custom table to fit perfectly overtop of the crate. I decided on plain, Parson’s legs because we already had a lot of turned legs in this space, so I thought this would break things up.  using 1″ x 4″ pine boards for the tabletop and a Kreg jig. We decided we wanted the crate to be large enough to slide easily out of the front or the ends of the table.
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I could have just painted the crate floor with floor and porch paint like I did to my sister’s Closet/Laundry room makeover subfloor Here.  But, A friend of mine said they had lined the bottom of her puppy’s crate with peel and stick vinyl to cover the wood.  It not only protects the wood, but makes a quick clean up if there was an accident.  I knew Sunny wouldn’t have an accident, but wanted to have the nice surface for easy cleaning.
diy dog crate 9

I am in the process of redecorating our living room, and the changes I’ve made haven’t left a great place to store our dogs’ crates. My pomeranians are small, but even their tiny crates are an a eyesore. I’m ready to find a more attractive solution to the problem! I’ve done some research and found that you really can have stylish dog crates that fit your decor. Who knew that dog crates and dog houses could look so cute? Come see for yourself!
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I liked most of the ideas in this article, esp. the cute yellow Ollie dresser…cute! But the one about the laundry room right next to the washer does appall me a bit. Washing machines and dryers are noisy, and a dog can hear that even 20 times louder! Please dont put your dogs in the laundry room! I remember my last dog always avoided going near the laundry area when the dryer was on. Also you need to consider the health risk that you expose your dog(s) to from the chemicals in the laundry room all day (detergent, dryer sheets, washing tabs etc). I guess all Im trying to say is perhaps there is a better healthier little spot in your house that you can give to your little loyal friend who gives you unconditional love every day of his life?

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